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Get help finding the necessary documents for your international shipment.

Get important regulatory information specific to your shipment.

Get a snapshot of country information including demographics, business information and statistics.

Identify individuals, companies, and other parties that have been denied international business transactions.

Find the World Customs Organization (WCO) tariff classification for your product.
   
Select a Document for Online Completion
Check the box next to each form you would like to complete online or upload your own trade document(s):

Not sure which document you need? Use Find International Documents in FedEx Global Trade Manager for help on which documents are required and recommended for your shipment.
To obtain additional information about these forms, we have provided explanations of them below.

To review the requirements for a destination country, please call FedEx Customer Service, 1.800.GoFedEx® 1.800.463.3339 .
Commercial Invoice for FedEx Express
The Commercial Invoice for FedEx Express is the basic statement of the seller to the buyer about the shipped goods; it ideally represents a complete record of the business transaction between the exporter and the foreign importer with regard to the goods sold. The Commercial Invoice for FedEx Express is used as one of the primary documents in the collection process and is the main document used by foreign customs for control, valuation, and duty determination. It is also a legal document of content; as such, it must fully identify the shipment, and it serves as the basis in preparing all other documents covering the shipment. All information on the invoice must conform to the particular entry requirements of the foreign country to which the goods are being shipped.
Commercial Invoice for FedEx Express Tips
  • The Commercial Invoice for FedEx Express represents a complete record of the business transaction between the exporter and the foreign importer with regard to the goods sold. It is also a legal document of content; it must fully identify the shipment, and it serves as the basis in preparing all other documents covering the shipment.
  • The Commercial Invoice for FedEx Express is only appropriate for international FedEx Express shipments (e.g., FedEx International Priority®).  For FedEx International Ground® shipments, use the Commercial Invoice for FedEx Ground.
  • The description of each commodity being shipped should include the following information:
    • Name by which item is known (generic and scientific, if any)
    • Harmonized system classification number.
    • Grade (material) and quantity of commodity
    • Marks, numbers, and symbols under which the commodity is packaged and sold
    • Composition and/or construction of product
    • Purchase price of each item (in the currency of purchase) and total invoice value
    • All charges and discounts associated with the transaction (including packaging, transportation, insurance, etc.) and the terms of sale
    • Type of packaging
  • Always include a copy of your Commercial Invoice INSIDE as well as OUTSIDE the package.
  • Always reference the air waybill number on the Commercial Invoice.
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Commercial Invoice for FedEx Ground
The Commercial Invoice for FedEx Ground is the basic statement of the seller to the buyer about the shipped goods; it ideally represents a complete record of the business transaction between the exporter and the foreign importer with regard to the goods sold. The Commercial Invoice for FedEx Ground is used as one of the primary documents in the collection process and is the main document used by foreign customs for control, valuation, and duty determination. It is also a legal document of content; as such, it must fully identify the shipment, and it serves as the basis in preparing all other documents covering the shipment. All information on the invoice must conform to the particular entry requirements of the foreign country to which the goods are being shipped.
Commercial Invoice for FedEx Ground Tips
  • The Commercial Invoice for FedEx Ground represents a complete record of the business transaction between the exporter and the foreign importer with regard to the goods sold. It is also a legal document of content; it must fully identify the shipment, and it serves as the basis in preparing all other documents covering the shipment.
  • The Commercial Invoice for FedEx Ground is only appropriate for FedEx International Ground® shipments between Canada and the United States. For FedEx Express shipments, use the Commercial Invoice for FedEx Express.
  • The description of each commodity being shipped should include the following information:
    • Name by which item is known (generic and scientific, if any)
    • Harmonized system classification number
    • Grade and quantity of commodity
    • Marks, numbers, and symbols under which the commodity is packaged and sold
    • Composition and/or construction of product
    • Purchase price of each item (in the currency of purchase) and total invoice value
    • All charges and discounts associated with the transaction (including packaging, transportation, insurance, etc.) and the terms of sale
    • Type of packaging
  • Always include a copy of your Commercial Invoice INSIDE as well as OUTSIDE the package.
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Pro Forma Invoice
A Pro Forma Invoice may be provided by a supplier prior to the actual shipment of merchandise to document to a customer the cost of the merchandise to be sold, as well as such charges as freight and insurance. The document is customarily used by the potential purchaser in applying for a letter of credit, import license, or foreign exchange allocation.
Pro Forma Invoice Tips
  • A Pro Forma Invoice may be provided by a supplier prior to the shipment of merchandise to detail to the buyer the kinds and quantities of goods to be sent, their value, weight, size, etc. The Pro Forma Invoice should include freight and insurance charges, and it may be used by the customer to apply for a letter of credit, import license, or foreign exchange allocation.
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NAFTA Certificate of Origin
Canada, Mexico, and the United States developed a uniform Certificate of Origin to certify that originating goods imported into their territories qualify for preferential treatment accorded by the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The uniform Certificate of Origin is used in all three countries and is printed in English, French, and Spanish. The certificate is completed in the language of the country of export or the language of the importing country, at the exporter's discretion; importers submit a translation to their own customs administration upon request.

A NAFTA Certificate of Origin can cover a single importation of goods or multiple importations of identical goods. Certificates that cover multiple shipments are called "blanket certificates" and may apply to goods imported within any 12-month period specified on the certificate. Although a Certificate of Origin may only cover goods imported over a 12-month period, it remains valid for NAFTA preference claims made up to four years from the date signed.

The Certificate of Origin must be completed and signed by the exporter of the goods. When the exporter is not the producer, the exporter can complete the certificate on the basis of knowledge of the goods' origin, reasonable reliance on the producer's written representation of the goods' origin, or a completed and signed Certificate of Origin for the goods voluntarily provided to the exporter by the producer.

A Certificate of Origin is required if:
  • The goods qualify under NAFTA rules of origin. Rules of origin are complex and may be determined by country of manufacture, regional value content, and/or tariff change (where the tariff classification changes after the completion of processing).
A Certificate of Origin is not required for:
  • Noncommercial importation.
NAFTA Certificate of Origin Tips
  • Canadian Customs regulations require that you keep this certificate and the backup documentation for six years following the year of its issuance. Failure to do so could invalidate the Preferential Duty Claim. For assistance, call 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 or Revenue Canada's NAFTA line at 1.800.661.6121 .
  • A NAFTA Certificate of Origin is required if the shipment contains goods that qualify for NAFTA origin and you want to enjoy the benefit of preferential duty.
  • Preference Criterion must be accurate; choose the correct code: A, B, C, D, E, or F.
  • "Net Cost" should be answered with "No" or "NC"; no other answer applies.
  • The language in which the certificate is written (English, French, or Spanish) is at the exporter's discretion; importers, however, may be required to submit a translation of the certificate to their own customs officials.
  • A NAFTA Certificate of Origin may cover a single importation of goods or multiple importation of identical goods. Certificates that cover multiple shipments are called blanket certificates and may apply to goods imported within any 12-month period. A blanket Certificate of Origin must be on file with the importing country's customs.
  • Importers may file a claim for NAFTA tariff preference up to one year from date of import and apply for a refund of customs duties.
  • Be sure to include a copy of your NAFTA Certificate of Origin INSIDE as well as OUTSIDE the shipment.
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Certificate of Origin
A Certificate of Origin is a document presented to customs authorities at the time of importation to authenticate the national origin of the merchandise. The certificate is signed by the shipper and depending on the destination country, certification by a local chamber of commerce or board of trade, notarization, and even issuance of a visa by a resident foreign consulate may be required. Certificates of Origin may be required to verify origin because of treaty arrangements, varying duty rates based on the origin of the goods, or most-favored-nation treatment that may benefit goods of Canadian origin. Certain countries may also use the Certificate of Origin for exchange rate purposes.
Certificate of Origin Tips
  • A Certificate of Origin certifies the country where the goods to be shipped were manufactured. A certificate may be required depending on the commodity to be exported and its destination. Many countries restrict the importation of goods from certain nations, limit (by country) the amount of a particular commodity that can be imported, or give favorable duty treatment to goods originating in specific countries.
  • To check whether this certificate is required for your export, call 1.800.GoFedEx 1.800.463.3339 . Once completed, this form must be notarized and then certified by your local chamber of commerce or board of trade. One original and two or more copies may be required.
  • Always include a copy of your Certificate of Origin INSIDE as well as OUTSIDE the package.
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Packing List
A Packing List may be required by the importing country and in some cases will facilitate the clearance of goods through customs. When a shipment is small, the information usually given on the Packing List may instead be incorporated into the Commercial Invoice. The completed Packing List is used by the exporter to ascertain the total shipping weight and volume so that shipping space may be reserved. It is also used as a check-off list to determine that the correct cargo has been received and is used by the buyer to inventory the merchandise. Finally, a Packing List can help during a customs exam to determine which box the product is in.
Packing List Tips
  • A Packing List shows information necessary for transport as well as the number and kinds of items being shipped. The Packing List is valuable in checking whether the shipment is correct.
  • Always include a copy of your Packing List INSIDE as well as OUTSIDE the package.
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FCC Form 740
This form provides the U.S. Federal Communications Commission with a declaration that imported radio frequency devices meet with FCC standards or will be brought into compliance with applicable technical rules.

This form must be completed for each radio frequency device, regardless of value, imported into the customs territory of the United States. A radio-frequency device may be considered to be anything that is electronic, battery-operated, or capable of sending, receiving, or interfering with radio signals. Examples of such devices include radio and TV receivers, converters, transmitters, transmitting devices, radio frequency amplifiers, microwave ovens, industrial heaters, ultrasonic transceivers, and computers.

A separate FCC Form 740 must be used for each different radio-frequency device or component in the shipment; however, a form is not required for subassemblies, parts, or components of radio-frequency devices if they do not constitute an essentially completed device requiring only the addition of cabinets, knobs, speakers, or similarly minor attachments before marketing or use.
FCC Form 740 Tips
  • This form must be completed for each radio frequency device, regardless of value, imported into the customs territory of the United States.
  • A radio-frequency device may be considered to be anything that is electronic, battery-operated, or capable of sending, receiving, or interfering with radio signals.
  • A separate FCC Form 740 must be used for each different radio-frequency device or component in the shipment.
  • The form may be completed by the shipper or recipient, but if the form is not submitted to customs by the shipper with the original entry, the shipment may be delayed in customs.
  • The Manufacturer information, full name and address, must be completed in full.
  • As used in this form, "marketing" means sell or lease, offer for sale or lease (including advertise for sale or lease or display at a trade show) or import, ship, or distribute for the purpose of selling or leasing or offering for sale or lease. Equipment imported for testing, evaluation or display may not be marketed (sold or leased, offered for sale or lease, advertised, etc.)
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Export Declaration B13A
The following information applies only to the Export Declaration B13A. Even though you may not be required to file an Export Declaration B13A for a shipment, you may still be responsible for filing other documents such as export permits, certificates, and licences required by the Canadian government departments or agencies that regulate the export of goods.

An Export Declaration B13A is required for the following:
  • Controlled, prohibited, or regulated goods, regardless of their value, that are destined for consumption outside the United States, Puerto Rico, or the U.S. Virgin Islands. Two copies of the form are required.
  • Goods valued at CAN$2,000 or more if the final destination of the goods is a country other than the United States, Puerto Rico, or the U.S. Virgin Islands.
In addition, if a shipment contains items grown, mined, or manufactured in different provinces, a separate form must be completed for each province.

An Export Declaration B13A is not required for the following:
  • Goods exported to the U.S., Puerto Rico, or the U.S. Virgin Islands.
  • Goods valued at less than CAN$2,000, unless they are controlled, prohibited, or regulated.
  • Personal gifts valued at less than CAN$2,000.
  • Diplomatic goods.
  • Goods exported temporarily for such reasons as repairs or trade shows.
Export Declaration B13A Tips
Information needed to complete the form:
  • Exporter Name and Address:  Provide the exporter's name and full address (i.e., owner, shipper, or consignor)
  • Business Number:  The Single Business Registration Number (SBRN) replaced the multiple numbers that businesses previously needed to deal with the Canadian Government. This unique registration number is assigned to cover any of the following types of accounts: corporate income tax; import/export; payroll deductions; and goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST). To obtain a BN visit www.businessregistration.gc.ca or telephone 1.800.959.5525 . Exporters from non-US countries may telephone (613) 952-3741.
  • Exporter Reference No.:  This section should contain a reference number that the exporter can use to trace the shipment. Usually, it is an invoice or purchase order number.
  • Country of Final Destination:  Provide the country of destination, as known at the time of export, where the goods are to be consumed, further processed, or manufactured.
  • Consignee Name and Complete Address:  Provide the full name and address of the ultimate consignee or, if not available, the name and address of the foreign importer.
  • Province of Origin:  Provide the province where the goods were grown, mined, or manufactured. When a shipment contains items from various provinces, a separate Export Declaration B13A must be completed for each province. If the goods were originally imported into Canada and are being exported in the same condition, indicate the province from which the goods were shipped.
  • Export Permit/Licence No.:  If the goods are subject to export controls, an export permit is required. Show the export permit number here.
  • Customs Authorization:  This section is for customs use only. The customs office receiving the goods will provide a stamp indicating the time and date the export declaration was received, the port code and a transaction number specific to this documents.
  • Number and Kind of Packages:  Provide the number of packages as well as the type of packaging. For carload, truck load, or container load shipments, show the car, trailer, or container number.
  • Name of Exporting Carrier:  Provide the name of the carrier that will transport the goods out of Canada from or through the point of exit.
  • Vessel Name:  Not applicable.
  • Currency of Declared Value:  Identify the currency of the value amounts (e.g., Canadian dollars, U.S. dollars, Japanese yen).
  • Country of Origin:  If imported goods are being exported in the same condition, show the country of origin. If the exported goods are of Canadian origin, or are further processed imported goods, leave this section blank.
  • Item Description:  Provide a complete description of the goods in normal trade terms with sufficient detail to verify the declared HS code. You must describe each item with a separate classification number on a separate line.
  • HS Commodity Code:  Provide the export HS number applied to the item. Exporters may show the Canadian 10-digit import HS number instead of the 8-digit export HS number. Exporters of chemicals listed in 7003 of the export control list should use the 10 digit import HS code. Exporters can obtain information on the Canadian HS codes by visiting: www.statcan.ca/english/tradedata/cec/index.htm.
  • Qty and Unit of Measure:  Provide the quantity for each line and indicate the unit for each item as specified by Canadian Export Classification requirements. Note: When weight is required, show the net weight not including outer coverings. You must use metric measurements. They should be shown in International System units and symbols.
  • Value F.O.B. Place of Exit:  Provide the value per line. This value must be F.O.B. (free on board) point of exit, exclusive of handling, insurance, discounts, or similar charges. If the goods are shipped "no charge", provide the value the goods would have been sold for under normal conditions.
  • Gross Weight:  Provide the gross shipping weight as indicated on the waybill, bill of lading, or similar transportation document.
  • Total Value F.O.B. Place of Exit:  This field is a total of the values in field Value of F.O.B point of exit.
  • Name of Person Responsible for Completion:  Provide the name, company, address, and telephone number of the person who completed the Export Declaration B13A.
  • Signature:  The person responsible for the accuracy of the information must sign in this field.
  • Date:  Provide the date the Export Declaration B13A was completed.
  • Status:  Indicate whether the person signing the declaration is the owner of the goods or an agent.
  • If Goods Are Not Sold, State Reason for Export:  If the goods are not sold, state the reason for the export (e.g., repair and return, lease, transfer of company goods). If the goods have been leased to a person/company in another country, identify the period of the lease or rental agreement.
  • Freight Charges to Place of Exit:  Provide the freight charge in Canadian dollars from the place of lading to the point of exit from Canada (estimate the amount if necessary). For example, for goods shipped from Edmonton to Vancouver by rail, to be put on a ship for Japan, show the rail costs only. For shipments leaving Toronto by air, show zero if no charges were incurred in getting the goods to the airport. If, for whatever reason, you could not include these freight charges in the values shown in fields Value F.O.B. Place of Exit and Total Value F.O.B. Place of Exit, check the box marked "No."
  • Mode of Transport from Place of Exit:  Check the appropriate box to indicate the last mode of transport by which the goods left the country. If you check the box marked "Other," specify the mode. Goods travelling by truck to an American airport for shipment overseas are considered road exports.
  • Container No.:  Not applicable.
  • Conveyance Identification No.:  Not applicable.
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FDA 2877 (FDA Radiation Form)
FDA 2877 (FDA Radiation Form) provides information to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on specific imported commodities that are subject to Radiation Control Standards. The form may be completed by the shipper, the consignee, or the importer of record. It may be necessary to complete this form in addition to FCC Form 740.

FDA 2287 (FDA Radiation Form) is required for the following commodities:
  • Television receivers
  • Television picture tubes
  • Cold cathode gas discharge ovens
  • Microwave ovens
  • Magnetron tubes
  • Display units incorporating CRTs, such as computer monitors, video monitors, or other monitors
  • CD-ROM players
  • Ultra violet lamps
  • High intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps
  • Diagnostic X-ray systems and their major components
  • X-ray tubes
  • Cabinet X-ray systems
  • Ultrasonic therapy products
  • Sunlamps and sunlamp products (tanning lamps, tanning beds, etc.)
  • Laser and laser products (including laser printers)
If the shipment contains a laptop computer, the description should clearly state whether or not a CD-ROM is included. If a CD-ROM is included, an FDA 2877 is required.
FDA Radiation Form Tips
  • FDA 2877 (FDA Radiation Form) provides information to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on specific imported commodities that are subject to Radiation Control Standards.
  • The form may be completed by the shipper, the consignee, or the importer of record.
  • It may be necessary to complete this form in addition to FCC Form 740.
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Video-Film Declaration
The form provides U.S. Customs with detailed information on any motion picture film being imported and is used to identify pornographic or seditious materials.

All video and motion-picture films, including video discs and blank tapes or films, regardless of value, require a Video-Film Declaration Form filled out by the seller or shipper. Alternatively, all the information on the Video-Film Declaration Form, including the statement at the bottom, may be written on the Commercial Invoice. If the shipment is valued at less than $US2,000, the information and statement may be written on the Air Waybill as long as the Air Waybill is signed.

Customs does not require a Video-Film Declaration for negatives, still photographs, CD-ROMs, or audio tapes.
Video-Film Declaration Tips
  • This form must be filled out by the seller of shipper of video and motion-picture films, including video discs and blank tapes or films, regardless of value, imported into the U.S.
  • A form is not required for negatives, still photographs, CD-ROMs, or audio tapes.
  • Length of video/film is usually recorded in linear feet. The formulas for calculating linear feet are as follows:
    • For 3/4" tapes 19 feet/minute (multiply the length of the tape in minutes by 19)
    • For 2" tapes 2500 feet/30 minutes (multiply the length of the tape in minutes by 83.3)
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Declaration for Free Entry of Returned American Products
This form is used to verify that commodities are of U.S. origin and that they have not been altered outside of the U.S. Goods of U.S. origin that have not been altered in any way enter the United States duty-free.

This form may be used when all of the following conditions are met:
  • The goods are made in the U.S. but are not physically or permanently marked "Made in the U.S.A."
  • The goods are valued at US$2,000 (approximately CAN$2,000) or more. If the goods are valued at less than this amount, the statement on the Declaration for Free Entry of Returned American Products may be written on the Commercial Invoice.
  • The goods were not altered or added to in any way while outside of the U.S.
In some cases, the Commercial Invoice must meet the following requirements:
  • It must state that the country of origin/manufacture is the U.S.
  • It must have a signature when a Declaration for Free Entry of Returned American Products is contained on the invoice.
  • The signature must be accompanied by a title such as traffic clerk/manager, export clerk, manager, owner, or president. Clerk or secretary are not acceptable.
This form may be used instead of a Shipper's Declaration, Actual Owner's Declaration, or a Manufacturer's Affidavit.

For shipments of value between US$2,000 and US$10,000 (approximately CAN$2,000 - $10,000), this form or its equivalent must be on hand to secure release. For shipments of greater value, a Manufacturer's Affidavit or other evidence is required to secure release.
Declaration for Free Entry of Returned American Products Tips
  • Goods of U.S. origin that have not been altered in any way enter the United States duty-free. This form is used to verify that the commodities qualify for duty-free entry.
  • This form may be used instead of a Shipper's Declaration, Actual Owner's Declaration, or a Manufacturer's Affidavit.
  • For shipments of value between US$2,000 and US$10,000 (approximately CAN$2,000 - $10,000), this form or its equivalent must be on hand to secure release. For shipments of greater value, a Manufacturer's Affidavit or other evidence is required to secure release.
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