Calculate freight shipping costs

FedEx driver closing the trailer to the freight truck on a docking bay
FedEx driver closing the trailer to the freight truck on a docking bay

Get freight rate quotes for less-than-truckload (LTL) shipments under 4,000 lbs.

Airport freight worker loading up an FedEx airplane
Airport freight worker loading freight cargo onto a FedEx airplane

Get freight rate quotes for express freight shipments under 2,200 lbs.

Warehouse worker talking to a FedEx truck driver surrounded by freight pallets
Warehouse worker talking to a FedEx truck driver surrounded by freight pallets

Get freight rate quotes for large-volume LTL shipments between 4,000 lbs. and 44,000 lbs.

Save time and compare rate quotes from multiple LTL carriers for LTL shipments all in one place.

The cost of freight shipping is affected by:

Rate quotes are estimations. Be as accurate as possible when creating your shipping label or Bill of Lading.
Inaccurate data can cause a shipment to be re-rated and incur fees.

Check for last-minute savings on your FedEx Express® Freight shipping.

We have programs that work like discounted hotel-booking websites, allowing you to fill empty trailers and airplanes at discounted rates. See if your shipment is eligible.

under 250 lbs icon

For shipments 
under 250 lbs., use
 FedEx® Great Rates Hotline.

over 250 lbs icon

For shipments
over 250 lbs., 
use FedEx MyQuote.


How your shipment dimensions and weight, including
packaging, affect your freight costs

How your shipment dimensions and weight, including packaging, affect your freight costs

The dimensions and weight of your shipment are used to calculate density. Density is the relationship between how much room an item takes up and its weight. For example, a square inch of lead is much denser and thus heavier than a square inch of cork.

The density of your shipment is used to find your freight classification.
In general, as you estimate freight costs, the higher the density of your shipment, the less it costs to ship.

The dimensions and weight of your shipment are used to calculate density. Density is the relationship between how much room an item takes up and its weight. For example, a square inch of lead is much denser and thus heavier than a square inch of cork.

The density of your shipment is used to find your freight classification. In general, as you estimate freight costs, the higher the density of your shipment, the less it costs to ship.

Our Freight Class Calculator tool will automatically calculate your density when you enter your shipment length, width, height and weight.

How to calculate freight density:

Step 1

Measure the length, width and height of the shipment in inches. Measure to the farthest points, including pallets, skids or other packaging. You’ll need to measure each pallet if you are shipping more than one.

Measure the length, width and height of the shipment in inches. Measure to the farthest points, including pallets, skids or other packaging. You’ll need to measure each pallet if you are shipping more than one.

A graphic showing a freight pallet marked with length, weight and height

Step 2

Multiply the three measurements (length, width and height).
The result is the total cubic inches of the shipment. If you have multiple pallets, multiply the length, width and height of each.
Add the results for each pallet together to get the total
cubic inches.

Multiply the three measurements (length, width and height). The result is the total cubic inches of the shipment. If you have multiple pallets, multiply the length, width and height of each. Add the results for each pallet together to get the total cubic inches.

A graphic showing  measurements equaling cubic inches

Step 3

Divide the total cubic inches by 1,728 (the number of cubic inches in a cubic foot). The answer is the cubic feet of the shipment.

Divide the total cubic inches by 1,728 (the number of cubic inches in a cubic foot). The answer is the cubic feet of
the shipment.

A graphic showing cubic inches being divided and equaling to cubic feet

Step 4

Divide the weight (in pounds) of the shipment by the total cubic feet. The result is the density (in pounds per cubic foot). For multiple pallets, add the weight of each pallet together before dividing by the total cubic feet of the shipment. You’ll need to round fractions to the nearest full cubic foot.

Divide the weight (in pounds) of the shipment by the total cubic feet. The result is the density (in pounds per cubic foot). For multiple pallets, add the weight of each pallet together before dividing by the total cubic feet of the shipment. You’ll need
to round fractions to the nearest
full cubic foot.

A graphic showing weight in pounds being divided by cubic feet equaling density


How your freight classification
affects your freight costs

How your freight classification affects your freight costs

Your freight classification is a standardized number that shows how difficult
your commodity is to ship and how much liability is involved in shipping.

Your freight classification is a standardized number that shows how difficult your commodity is to ship and how much liability is involved in shipping.

Your freight class is determined by:

Your freight class is
determined by:

Illustration of how freight class is determined
Illustration of how freight class is determined
number 1 icon
number 1 icon

What you're shipping

number 2 icon
number 2 icon

How dense it is (calculated  by its demensions and weight)

number 3 icon
number 3 icon

The value of the item

number 4 icon
number 4 icon

If the item requires special loading equipment or precautions

number 5 icon
number 5 icon

How an item fits inside the trailer with other freight

boxes stacked on a freight pallet with shipping icons above it
boxes stacked on a freight pallet with shipping icons above it

Use the FedEx LTL Freight Classification Tool to find your freight class.

Generally, the higher the density of your product, the lower the classification (typically 50–85).
More fragile and/or less dense products usually have higher classifications (typically 125–500).
The lower the classification, the less it costs to ship.

Generally, the higher the density of your product, the lower the classification
(typically 50–85). More fragile
and/or less dense products usually have higher classifications
(typically 125–500). The lower the classification, the less it costs to ship.


How the shipping service you choose
affects your freight costs

How the shipping service you choose affects your freight costs

Typically, the faster you ship your freight, the more it costs.
 

For economical LTL freight shipping domestically and throughout North America, choose from:

For domestic U.S. express shipping, choose from:

For domestic U.S. express shipping,
choose from:

For international express shipping, choose from:

For international express shipping,
choose from:


FedEx airplane flying in mid-air

How the origin and destination of your shipment affects your freight costs

It costs more to ship longer distances. When you estimate freight costs for international shipments, remember there may be a change in currency and added costs in duties and taxes.


How surcharges affect your
freight costs

When you're determining freight rates, remember there are surcharges for special circumstances, handling needs and delivery and pickup conditions. Surcharges are different for LTL and express shipments. Learn more about these surcharges.

A FedEx driver loading freight onto a semi-truck liftgate
A FedEx driver loading freight onto a semi-truck liftgate

How surcharges affect your
freight costs

When you're determining freight rates, remember there are surcharges for special circumstances, handling needs and delivery and pickup conditions. Surcharges are different for LTL and express shipments. Learn more about these surcharges.

Fuel surcharges also affect your LTL freight rates.

The U.S. Department of Energy sets the weekly national average diesel fuel price each Monday. That average price is used to determine the fuel surcharges and is standard for all freight carriers. For more information, download the FXF 100 Series Rules tariff and see item 570.

A FedEx truck hauling freight going down the highway
A FedEx truck hauling freight going down the highway

Fuel surcharges also affect your LTL freight rates

The U.S. Department of Energy sets the weekly national average diesel fuel price each Monday. That average price is used to determine the fuel surcharges and is standard for all freight carriers. For more information, download the FXF 100 Series Rules tariff and see item 570.


How to get discounts and other tips
to save on freight shipping costs

How to get discounts and other tips to save on freight shipping costs

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The simplest way to save on freight shipping is to open an account with FedEx. You can save up to 60% off.*

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Combine shipments using the FedEx Freight box. Because you don’t have to classify your shipments, you can combine different commodities in one box. Plus, you get predictable flat rates and more security.

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Check in with your freight sales representative at least once a year to negotiate your freight rates. You may be able to get a better volume discount. And if you’re running a dock computer with shipping software, make sure you update it as well. Your programs could be quoting you old pricing.

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Ensure your team is paying attention to whether or not the destination has a dock. Without a dock, you’ll need to request a liftgate for the delivery. And not having a liftgate when you need one delays your delivery and can cause extra fees.

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Check out the FedEx API Integration Program. With the program, you can automate freight functions and get auto-populated Bills of Lading. It can also do things like automatically email freight tracking information to customers, which cuts down on hundreds of routine customer service calls.

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Do you use websites to get the best last-minute rates on hotels and airline tickets? We have similar programs that can give you last minute savings on shipping. See if your shipment is eligible.

For shipments:

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Have your FedEx account number, shipment origin and destination countries, weight and dimensions ready before heading online or calling.

Need help with freight shipping but don't have a sales representative?

Fill out a request form and a FedEx sales consultant will call you in 1–2 business days.

Fill out a request form and a FedEx sales consultant will call you in
1–2 business days.

*Applies to FXF 1000 and FXF 501 Base Rates customers only. All services are subject to the terms and conditions of the FXF 100 Series Rules Tariff. The 60% discount applies to eligible FedEx Freight Priority and FedEx Freight Economy shipments within the contiguous U.S., shipments between the U.S. and Canada, and also includes shipments to Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico for the U.S. portion of the move. FedEx shipping discounts are off standard list rates and cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. Discounts are exclusive of any FedEx surcharges, premiums, minimums, accessorial charges or special handling fees. Customers with current pricing and/or non-U.S., non-Canada-based billing addresses are not eligible for the 60% discount.

**Flat rates based on zone pricing. Find rates and zone information. Rates are subject to the General Rate Increase (GRI), and all accessorial charges in the FedEx Freight 100 Rules Tariff will apply. Exception: Item 404 (absolute minimum charge) will not apply as the FedEx Freight box is not discountable. Pricing is subject to the standard FedEx Freight 100 fuel surcharge. Use of the FedEx Freight box will supersede any negotiated pricing. Maximum liability is $7.50 per lb. Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Canada and Mexico are not covered by FedEx Freight box rates. Hazardous materials are prohibited. Maximum weight allowed for each freight box is 1,200 lbs.